Gamification – What Is It and How Can It Help Agencies?

My last post concerned the use of raffles by insurance agencies and agents to promote the making of referrals.  I thought it was an innovative idea, and one that makes use of the insights into human behavior that are the basis for what is known as gamification.  Gamification is the application of the principles and techniques used by game makers to develop popular games to encourage desired behavior in non-game activities.  Research has shown that creating a competition among a group of people for a reward for desired behavior increases the engagement of those people in the desired behavior beyond just offering the reward.  This is due to our natural desire to compete and the joy that comes with winning a competition.

Staging sales contests among salespersons with the winner receiving a reward of some type (e.g., bonus, trip) is a long standing practice among sales oriented businesses.  However, there is nothing to prevent the application of such a strategy to an agency’s other employees or its customers or potential customers to encourage them to engage in a desired behavior.  Holding a raffle is a very simple application of gamification research, which has confirmed that most people would prefer to gamble on getting a bigger prize than take a sure thing if the prize is something they value.

In the case of the raffle described in my last post, the agency could have opted to give a gift card or other reward with a relatively small value for every referral made, but the research indicates more people would participate (i.e., make a referral) if the potential reward for doing so was desirable enough.  In this case, that reward had a value of several hundred dollars.  The nature of the reward can also be used to encourage the members of a specific target market to participate.  In the agency raffle I wrote about, the prize was a much sought after tech gadget.

Even attorneys are not immune from gamification principles.  Just last week, I signed up to make a blood donation to the Red Cross in response to an offer to be entered into a drawing for a $1,000 shopping spree.  I normally make a blood donation every three or four months, but decided to break that pattern and give sooner due to this offer.  These type of promotions have become commonplace in today’s world for the simple reason that they work to engage more people in whatever behavior is desired than other types of promotions.

Earlier this year, American Modern Insurance Group applied gamification principles to a program designed to educate its agents about its specialty residential insurance products.  Instead of holding seminars or webinars, the company created weekly contests that required its agents to answer questions about how its products would apply to unusual situations.  The agents were awarded points for correct answers and the speed with which those answers were given.  Those agents with the most points at the end of the contest period will be entered into a drawing to be named the “Most Confident Agent in the World”, and each successfully completed weekly contest earns an agent an entry into a drawing for a cash prize. (Click here for an article on this program.)

The possibilities for applying gamification principals and techniques to the promotion of an agency, the education and training of its employees, and the improvement of its business processes are limited only by one’s imagination.  If you are interested in learning more about how those principles and techniques can be used for those purposes, click here for a whitepaper that addresses just that topic.

 

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