Recording Customer Telephone Calls – A Good Idea But Is It Legal?

In a recent post on his blog, Steve Anderson recommended that insurance agents take advantage of the new telecommunications technology that makes it relatively easy to record all incoming and outgoing telephone calls.   He suggested that making such recordings could become the primary means by which an agency documents its contact with its customers and potentially, its insurance companies.  This would save time by eliminating the need to type information about such calls into the agency management system.  There are software products that will integrate recorded telephone calls with those systems and associate the recordings with the appropriate customer and policy.  If you still want to have the security of an electronic “paper trail”, there are many transcription services available that can create such a trail much faster than your office staff.

Please see his blog post for Mr. Anderson’s thoughts about other advantages to the recording by an agency of its telephone calls with its customers and the steps an agency should take before implementing such a procedure.  However, one very  important aspect of telephone call recording was initially overlooked by Mr. Anderson; its legality.  Under federal law, it is illegal to make such recordings without the consent of at least one party to the conversation.  But each state is free to impose greater consent requirements, and it is the requirements of the state in which each party to the call is located that will govern the legality of its recording with respect to that party.  In checking the laws of Georgia and the states that surround it, I found that all but one of them require the consent of only one party to the recording of a telephone call.  Florida was the only state that imposed a greater consent requirement.  Under its law, all the parties to a telephone call must consent to its recording.

If all your agency’s customers are located in Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, South Carolina, or North Carolina, there is no need to obtain the consent of those customers to the recording of their telephone calls.   However, if the agency decides to record all such calls, to avoid any potential issues with its customers or other parties over the recording of their telephone conversations without their knowledge, it would be a good idea to include an announcement before any incoming call that it will be recorded. Such an announcement can be programmed into many of the new telephone systems to play when the call is first answered and before any of the agency staff actually speak to the caller. It should protect the agency from violating the law of Florida and any other states that require the consent of all parties to the recording of telephone calls by allowing the agency to argue that the caller’s proceeding with the telephone call after hearing the announcement amounted to its consent to the recording of the call. That is apparently the conclusion drawn by many large companies, as such an announcement is routinely played when calls are made to their customer service centers.

If you want to be able to safely record outgoing calls, the agency staff will need to be trained to begin each such call with an announcement that it will be recorded and ask the other party if that is acceptable.  Such a procedure is advisable as the violation of the law on the recording of telephone calls is a crime, and in Georgia and most of the surrounding states, it is a felony.  Some of those states also give the other parties to such calls a right to sue for damages, if the law is violated.

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